Meet: Nadeem Islam, star of Deafinitely Theatre’s children’s play Something Else

Posted on May 17, 2017


Nadeem Islam is an actor, comedian, presenter, community facilitator and a trainee film-maker.  His previous stage work includes Beyond the Canon (National Theatre) and for television, his work includes Small World.  He has also worked as a presenter on programmes such as Lost Community and Up For It, and will appear as multitple characters in the comedy sketch show Deaf Funny.

What’s the play about?

The play focuses on a character called Something Else. He has no friends and lives by himself in a house on a hill. One day he discovers a book on ‘How To Make Friends’.

After reading it he decides to try and make friends with the local people but it doesn’t work. They discriminate against him because he looks different, so he returns to his home sad and alone.

One day a character called Something arrives at his house. He looks completely different to Something Else but is friendly and willing to be his friend. But Something Else rejects him and tells him to leave. Looking in the mirror he has a moment of realisation about how he felt when he was treated differently.

He chases after Something and says they can indeed be friends and they develop a strong friendship. The lesson is applied once again when a human arrives on the scene.

The play explores the subject of diversity and how we treat each other in society. Is it really fair to treat someone differently because of their appearance? Is it fair for someone to be victimised? This play seeks to portray how that person feels from their perspective.

Hopefully it will encourage children to be more aware of people’s differences and how this is not something to be afraid of. Promoting the idea instead that people who are seemingly different can be happy together and live in harmony.

Tell me about your character

Something Else is a character who has been neglected and left out of activities because he simply looks different. He’s blue, has a big nose, unusual hair and is short and stumpy.

Despite being very energetic and friendly he is desperately lonely and sad. It’s his dream to be accepted in society and finally have friends to play with, but is this something he can ever achieve?

Is this your first play?

Yes, indeed. Something Else is my first theatre production with a main credit! I have been involved in theatre before, but they were mainly ensemble parts or part of a learning environment. This will be my first big role on stage with my name on the credits!

You’ve been busy lately – you’ve presented Up For It and acted in Deaf Funny. How have you juggled it all?

To be honest, I don’t even know myself how I’ve managed!

This career path has always been my dream and I believe it’s important that you chase your dreams. Yes, it can be tiring and hard work at times, but my ambition keeps me focused and gives me the energy to get through it.

I’m also very fortunate to have worked with some great directors and fellow actors and we always support each other. It really gives you extra motivation knowing that you can rely on those around you.

What’s the best thing about being in this play?

The best thing is that when growing up I dreamed that some day I would be on stage playing a character such as this. A fun role that not only will entertain an audience but one that delivers such a powerful and important message.

It’s great to gain this experience of being on stage but also to work with a respected company such as Deafinitely Theatre, plus the great cast and team.

To find out more about Something Else, click here, or go to the theatre websites below:

Sunday 28th May 2017
1pm and 3.30pm
Derby Theatre
derbytheatre.co.uk

Tuesday 30th May 2017
2pm
Wyndham’s Theatre, London
Tickets available through competition – visit – deafinitelytheatre.co.uk

Thursday 1st June 2017
1pm and 3.30pm
Actacentre in Bristol
Acta-bristol.com

Friday 2nd June 2017
1pm and 3.30pm
Pegasus Theatre in Oxford
Pegasustheatre.org.uk

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Posted in: meet