Deaf News: Royal Shakespeare Company provides semi-integrated BSL performances

Posted on March 22, 2017



The Royal Shakespeare Company (RSC) is extending its offer of semi-integrated British Sign Language performances (BSL) for its latest season.

The Earthworks, Myth and Julius Caesar, all performed in Stratford-Upon-Avon, will each feature a BSL performance which sees an interpreter work alongside the actors on stage, in costume as part of the show.

Audiences can also find out more about the play with a BSL Theatre Tour which will give people the chance to explore a range of wigs and costumes from the productions.

The one-hour tour will be led by a British Sign Language interpreter and theatre goers can also take part in a special free interpreted post-show talk on the play.

The Earthworks / Myth 
The Other Place: 24 May – 17 June 2017
British Sign Language Performance: Tuesday, 13 June, 2017, 7.30pm
British Sign Language Theatre Tour: Tuesday, 13 June, 2017, 5pm-6pm

Julius Caesar
The Royal Shakespeare Theatre: until 9 September 2017
British Sign Language Performance: Monday, August 14, 2017, 7.15pm
British Sign Language Theatre Tour: Monday, August 14 2017, 5pm-6pm

Erica Whyman, RSC Deputy Artistic Director said:

I am very pleased and proud that we are extending our commitment to integrated British Sign Language performances. I have been committed for a long time to working with Deaf actors and with BSL interpreters to integrate sign language in a way which is accessible to a Deaf and hearing audience. I was delighted when we were able to introduce this initiative at the RSC with The Christmas Truce in 2014 and then with our first Shakespeare on A Midsummer Night’s Dream: A Play for the Nation in 2016. We have quickly built a receptive audience for this work so I am looking forward to this next season very much.”

To book tickets and for more information on the RSC’s access work visit: www.rsc.org.uk/your-visit/access/assisted-performances/forthcoming-performances

 

 

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Posted in: deaf news